Movie Lover’s Intermission (NFLX,JPM)

Movie Lover’s Intermission (NFLX,JPM)   If there’s one thing we’ve come to rely on over the last couple of decades, it’s the resiliency of tech – or at least the resiliency of the tech investor, a love junkie so consumed with his heart’s one desire that he keeps coming back – even after taking repeated beatings. We don’t make this stuff up, folks.   The dot.com bubble burst at the turn of the century; the Lehman Bros. debacle squared big tech (along with everything else) a decade back; and over the last year, we’ve seen several dumps of between 20% to 30% on all the FAANG stocks.   But does anyone care…?   Tech investors seem nonplussed.  They’re a loyal lot.  And that’s fine.   But we here at The Modern Bull are somewhat different.  We don’t have a great deal of hope for the longevity of things tech-y, but we do view them favorably as vehicles for robust and profitable trades.  Hence a company like Tesla, for whom we bear no love whatsoever, we still view as a high beta means of realizing our financial goals.   That said, there are now several reasons to be worried about big…

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Organic Investing (HAIN,LMNR,GDX,JPM)

Organic Investing (HAIN,LMNR,GDX,JPM)   The real question is how many people are prepared to put a seed in the ground, water it and watch it grow, helping it along with whatever nourishment it requires – fertilizer, water – until such time as its fruit can be plucked and eaten.   Are you among that bunch?   And why is it so important?  Why is it ‘the real question’?   Call us crazoids and renegades, but that’s the way we see it.  The time’s a’coming when those who can pull their sustenance from the good earth will be the ones to endure.  While those who rob, steal and fake their way through life, posing as specialists and experts of every whatnot and wherefore, will politely be shown the door. And will more than likely starve.   Because the only real skills one needs in this world are those of the farmer.   You heard it right.   Ask him how he grows his fruit and vegetables, and pay attention.  Let him explain the details of animal husbandry, how he procures his meat, milk, fish and eggs, and write it down – every word.   Because there’s little more that will get…

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The Department of Redundancy Dept. (JPM)

The Department of Redundancy Dept. (JPM)   It’s getting to be something of a mantra in the financial world that stocks are currently overpriced and at risk of a sharp pullback.  Not just today, but ever since the Trump took office we’ve been hearing that same old refrain: that there’s little to support current valuations and that stocks will shortly have to respond to the market’s being extended and staying extended for such a… well… extended period.   Heh, heh…   Anyway, it’s taken on a life of its own, with nearly everyone on the same side of the boat, screaming ‘Sell!’, or ‘Buy PUTS!’, or ‘Hedge yourself!’, or ‘Fire Bannon!’ or what have you.   And it appears there are very few left on the bullish side of the ledger as the summer comes to a close, and we enter what has traditionally been the most volatile month for the stock market, September. That said, we at Normandy have also alluded to the dearth of positive signs on both the earnings and economic fronts.  Even so, we’ve stopped short of taking an outright bearish stance on the market.  There’s too much heat and heaving in the bearish pronouncements we…

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Hiring inches up in December, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) settles suit and Shell to cut Canadian jobs.

Markets were heading lower on Friday after data was released that showed there was a growth in U.S. hiring but wages did not follow suit. The Labor Department showed that there an addition of 252,000 new jobs in December. There was also an upward revision of November’s data to show gains of 353,000. There a drop of 0.2% in the jobless rate to 5.6%. This marks a 6 and a half-year low for the data. The small shadow on the data released today was an unexpected drop in wages. There was a decline of 0.2% or five-cents. An analyst with JPMorgan, Michael Feroli, said, “There is no obvious fundamental economic factor that would contribute to today’s number. We are disposed to view this decline as a one-off.” Shares of JPMorgan Chase & Co (JPM) were sinking down over 1.4% after the company agreed to pay $500 million to settle a class action suit against them. The suit was tied to the sale of Bear Stearns’. The banking giant purchased Bear Stearns in 2008 for $17.58 billion at the height of the financial crisis. JPMorgan will be paying the money to investors. The most recent data about this this suit said that…

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U.S. auto sales up (GM), JPMorgan Chase (JPM) settles lawsuit and Oil hits new lows.

Markets were heading lower on Monday after U.S. auto sales data was released for the last month of 2014. General Motors (GM) surpassed expectations with a 19% gain to a total of 274,483. Pickup-truck sales reached 87,000, which brought the company’s total sales for the year to 2.9 million. This also marked the strongest December on record for the automaker in seven years. Ford (F) announced that their sales were up 1.2%, to a total of 220,671. The company partially attributed the lower data to smaller-than-expected sales to rental companies and fewer supplies of their top-selling F-150 pickup. In total for the year, Ford reported sales of 2.5 million, down 1% from 2013. Nissan Motor C. (NSANY) reported that they sold 117,318 vehicles in December. The sales were pushed by an increase of 12% in car sales. The strongest selling cars were the Altima and the Lead. Annual sales came in at 1.4 million, which was an 11% increase over the year before. Analysts are projecting sales to slow down in the coming year to between 16.7 million to 17 million. Adam Jonas, an analyst with Morgan Stanley, said, “U.S. auto sales are dancing to a very different (and we believe…

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Jobs data misses expectations, JPMorgan (JPM) to cut an additional 3,000 jobs and Home Depot (HD) says 53 million email addresses stolen

Markets were relatively flat on Friday after jobs data was reported and missed expectations. The Labor Department said that there was an addition of 214,000 jobs last month and the unemployment rate ticked slightly lower. October’s jobs missed the 230,000 that economists were projecting. The unemployment rate fell to 5.8% from the previous month’s 5.9%, this marks the lowest unemployment rate since the recession. September’s data was upwardly revised from the original 248,000 new jobs to 256,000 jobs. There was also an additional of 23,000 to the 180,000 jobs reported in August. Rich Thompson, chief human resources officer at Adecco Group North America, said, “It’s good. It’s consistent solid growth. Anytime you are over 200,000 that is good progress.” Shares of JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) were trading slightly higher after the banking giant reported that they would be cutting an additional 3,000 jobs from their banking sector. This is more than they originally planned on. By the end of the year, the company said they will have cut a total of 27,000 jobs from their consumer banking unit. When broken down, they will be slashing 4,000 jobs from their car, merchant and auto unit, which is more than the…

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Unemployment hits six-year low, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) cyber breach affected 76 million and U.S. trade gap shrunk in August

Markets were heading higher on Friday after news was released that the U.S. unemployment rate hit a 6-year low in September. The Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate sank to 5.9%, a low not seen since July 2008. The drop in jobless numbers was largely attributed to a burst in new hiring last month. There was an addition of 248,000 new jobs and the department upwardly revised July and August’s numbers to add 69,000 more jobs than previously thought. This takes the economy one step closer to the 5.5% unemployment rate, which is considered a healthy level. The jobs gains were strong amongst all sectors. There was an addition of 81,000 jobs in the professional sector, which was the most in seven-months. There was also an addition of 16,000 jobs in construction and 4,000 in manufacturing. Despite the strong growth news, there was no hourly growth in September, which is uncommon in times of healthy job growth. Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit, said, “Policymakers will certainly be worried by the lack of wage growth. Without substantially higher wage growth, the fear is that households will pull back on consumption if interest rates and borrowing costs start rising, snuffling…

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